ARTISTS

Alex Croft
Alex Croft

​During his art foundation degree at Kingston is where Alex pushed his drawing styles further and developed his own style of one line drawings and this came through in his street art later. Alex pushed the drawing technique to the point where he created a style that generated different feelings and expressions in the faces of the characters. This technique is a one-line technique where you don’t take the pen off the paper and commit to completing all the lines needed to create a face or image. After finishing his foundation year with a photographic exhibition of the London underground confused as to what direction to  follow he decided to take a break for a year and work in HK. During this time he realised that he wanted to study photography as a way of documenting his street art and other art in the future. After starting his BA in Fine Art and Photography Alex was highly inspired by his teacher Vince Wade who straight off the bat gave them a project simply called Ways Of Seeing that had a big impact on Alex’s work. In his final year is where he went full circle back to the graffiti and street art he always loved merging fine art photography and stencil street art together making a PHOTOGRAFF. After completing his degree in London Alex moved back to his home Hong Kong inspired and started putting some work up in the street. Living as a Artist Alex can work closely with companies to create design work and execute painting works needed for companies based of their ideas but always having his own spin on the subject or idea. Alex has a passion using spray paint and stencils to create his works with and has a eye for composition. Alex never used Instagram in the past but In recent years Alex’s painting for Goods Of Desire life style brand on Graham Street central Hong Kong has attracted tourists from all over the world and in recent months it has been coined The ‘Instagram Wall’ as its become Hong Kong's most photographed wall ! Over time Alex has continued to create street art and push his skills further and also has become a experienced interior decorator by trade doing Murals and Special Finishes .

Daphne Mandel
Daphne Mandel

Daphné Mandel was born in 1975 in Lausanne, Switzerland to a French father and a Dutch mother and grew up in Paris.  She credits her Dutch grandmother, a respected textile artist, with instilling in her a deep appreciation of art and painting.  Daphné studied architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning in Versailles and graduated in 2000.  She co-founded the Paris based landscape architecture and urban planning firm Gilot&Mandel Paysage.  She and her partner were named "Best Young Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture Professionals" by the French Ministry of Culture (2006).  As a result, a number of public parks, city centres, cultural sites, and sports venues in France and abroad bear Daphne's touch.  She found inspiration in her move to Hong Kong in 2008 to explore other means of creative and artistic expression. Daphné's artworks explore old Hong Kong’s architecture while introducing imaginary and whimsical elements as a way to exploit the incredible urban paradoxes of this city in constant metamorphosis.   The evolution of her works is tied inexorably to the evolution of Daphné's perception of the city.  In her first years in Hong Kong, as she was trying to comprehend the city around her, her works depicted Hong Kong’s facades as decor while catching glimpses of the goings on inside.  Daphné’s work has morphed over the intervening years and she now seeks to represent, interpret and transform what she discovered.  The works continue to evolve in a fantasized urbanscape, often disconnected from any sense of reality but incorporating poetry and illusion.  Using architectural rendering techniques permits Daphné to give a sense of ultra-realism to her works which contrasts with the more artisanal modes of expression such as painting and crayon.  She finds that the perfect aesthetic and good balance exists somewhere between the tremendous possibilities offered by contemporary digital tools and more tactile, artisanal and traditional techniques, both of which are essential to her work. This contrast is also a mirror of Hong Kong’s urban aesthetic: the luxurious and polished juxtaposed with the untidied and derelict.

Eric Niebuhr
Eric Niebuhr

Born in La Marque, TX in 1972, American-Australian artist Eric Niebuhr has lived in Houston, London, Los Angeles and Sydney before moving to Hong Kong in October 2012. He held his first solo exhibition in Hong Kong in 2015, and has shown internationally including the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London and the Jewish Museum in San Francisco. In addition to receiving reviews in numerous publications including Artforum magazine and The Los Angeles Times, he has had recent interviews in Artnews, The South China Morning Post, Reuters TV, and a RTHK Hong Kong Heritage radio program. My paintings are based on gouache and computer-aided studies of photo-based and digital sources. I use acrylic with a combination of mediums to create puddled areas of paint, amorphous passages, and flat shapes.  I often have an emotive direction in mind, but hope to create an image that lends itself to indefinite readings. I am interested in the abstract formal qualities that the source and the paint material offers, as well as the psychic impression or suggestive visuals derived from the original source. The “Dragon Holes” paintings are formally and thematically inspired by a unique Hong Kong architectural feature, “dragon holes”; a Feng Shui design concept for a building to have a passage (hole), in order to allow a dragon to pass through freely. The colors and forms on the facades caused by the atmospheric effects at different intervals of the day offer the formal elements I use in constructing the painting. I became interested in exploring the idea of these building’s framing of space, especially in relation to the historically use of the void in painting and the concept of a portal, which could transport the viewer from one space into another. Chance and circumstance is something that continues to be a strong pull for discovering visual sources. My current developing series reference trolley pushcarts used for transporting goods and rubbish on the streets of Hong Kong. The improvised use of materials to bundle objects on the carts become the composition source for color, line, and shapes in the paintings. I first encountered a particularly striking trolley cart walking around the streets of Hong Kong.  The arrangement of bungee cords, ribbon, fabric and rope on the cart created an uncanny moment that stopped me in my tracks.  After that unexpected encounter, I began purposefully looking at the backs of trolley carts as accidental abstract and expressive compositions, making an effort to find ones that seem to have their own individual expressions. 

Francesco Lietti
Francesco Lietti

Francesco Lietti has been living in Hong Kong since early 2006 and his love of this vibrant, eclectic city is immediately apparent in his works, which derives from the mnemonic imagery of the artist, who lives in symbiosis with the themes of travel and discovery. When first visiting Hong Kong in the summer of 2005, the painter experienced an overwhelming sensation: fascinated by the variety of colours, the rich smells and the plethora of images, he was drawn to return and stay. This exciting metropolis is something you cannot just put into a frame: something would spill out, something would be missing; one can catch the details, but he or she would never be able to capture the entire picture. The artist portrays this through simple and direct forms: he paints naïve visions that often have a humorous quality, describing the city in an almost caricatured magnificence. Through the use of striking colours the painter captures the essence of Hong Kong’s famous harbour skyline and makes it his own. His paintings hover between reality and fantasy; using strong blocks of paint to represent the buildings, Lietti also includes smaller patches of textured colour, which dance across the cityscape, giving it that dream-like, ephemeral quality. The artist works in acrylic and oils on canvas and also adds collage to give his paintings texture and depth. He then finishes his pieces with a thick, glossy resin, further enhancing the brightness of the colours. Lietti also captures the colours and delights of other Asian destinations. The lush greens of Vietnam and Bali, the golden sunsets of Rajasthan, the deep blue seascapes of the Philippines; these are just some of the many places he has visited and experienced. The artist gives us rare glimpses, merging reality with a far away magical world. Francesco was born in Lecco, on the southern shore of Lake Como in Italy. He studied architecture in Milan and furthered his studies in Paris at the École des Beaux Arts, La Seine and also at the Clerkenwell College of Printing in London. His works are featured in private collections worldwide.

Harold De Puymorin
Harold De Puymorin

Originally from Toulouse, France and now living and working in Hong Kong as a full-time photographer, I split my time between commissioned work and personal projects. My commissioned works span architecture and interiors to portraits, as well as other commercial assignments; I enjoy collaborating across industries, subjects and moods to make your vision come alive, so please reach out for more details. Photography has been a sometimes dizzying journey of exploration as I sought to find my true ‘voice’ as an artist, and has included much experimentation in terms of method, style and subject. As I first started playing with digital cameras, my initial artistic approach leant towards experimentation and manipulation; it took several years to really sit myself down and begin to understand the purpose of taking pictures—years in which I did not take almost any personal photos as they weren’t able to satiate my new sense of passion and purpose. Once I began film photography, I understood the approach that my work needed, namely ‘Taking the time.’ This concept sounds simple, but I quite literally needed to ‘take the time’ during those experimental years to consider what really matters to me. My photography is not about recognition, it’s about self-therapy: does taking this picture make me happy? How much energy, how much of myself, am I willing to put into the project? I today consider this part of my everyday life, whether I’m documenting the cityscapes that surround me, scenes of daily life in the streets of Hong Kong, or something altogether more abstract yet visually pleasing. More that just following a trend, film photography has helped me understand that the moment is more important than the picture itself. Life is to be lived and to be enjoyed, and if we are lucky, we are able to freeze small glimpses of its experiences within a frame.

Michael Kistler
Michael Kistler

Michael Kistler is a Hong Kong artist specializing in fine art street photography. Originally from Minneapolis, he started shooting on a compact Ricoh during his first trip to Europe at age 18. After many years of travel that included stints in Germany, Istanbul and Northern California, he settled in Tokyo, spending more than 10 years there before moving with his family to Hong Kong in 2014. His time in Tokyo was instrumental to the development of his photographic style as he experimented with blur, movement and other abstract elements while drawing inspiration from street masters like Daido Moriyama and Saul Leiter. A signature hallmark of his work is the often abstract human element and its connection to the city; the urban landscape and its structures provide permanence while people come and go, creating a dynamic environment of fleeting moments. He is constantly searching for and exploring unconventional perspectives and unique moments where people and the urban landscape collide, merge and co-exist. In addition to having his work exhibited in Tokyo, NYC, Astoria, Minneapolis, London, Dublin, Porto and Hong Kong, Michael offers photography workshops and mentoring in Hong Kong; he has also conducted workshops in Tokyo, Shanghai, Beijing, Dubai, Minneapolis, Dublin, Yangon, Kuala Lumpur and Ho Chi Minh City.   His work has been featured by Artaaps, Marie Claire, Felosophie, Sassy HK, The Honeycombers, The Global Fund for Children, Isthumus Journal, HK Tatler, Volcom, Vans HK, Cathay Pacific, Vogue Italy, Localiiz HK, Mobiography Magazine, Street Dreams Mag, Drkrms, HK Magazine, Zolima CityMag, Style-tips.com, The Wanderlister, China Daily and the South China Morning Post. Michael works with both the Mandarin Oriental and Quintessentially HK to provide bespoke urban photo experiences for their exclusive clientele. He has also donated select art pieces and workshops in support of Changing Young Lives Foundation, Teen's Key, Mother's Choice and AAJA Asia.

Michelle Kuen Suet Fung
Michelle Kuen Suet Fung

Michelle Kuen Suet Fung is a visual artist and art educator whose ambitious ongoing oeuvre revolves around a grand narrative of a dystopian world set in the year 2084. With bold and unfettered imagination, subtle humour, and delicate pathos, she weaves acute observations of the early twenty-first century into an absurd, fantastical landscape populated with plastic-eating humans, flying elephants, and islands floating in the sky, and frequently alludes to literary influences such as Orwell and Swift. Her works present a fictional geopolitical map of a bizarre future, one impacted by changes in the Anthropocene. Fung’s works span a broad range of media including text, books, drawing, painting, printmaking, installation, performances and short films, each chosen carefully for its inherent historical and experiential implications. Her newest exhibition, Polluta, Floating Artist Colony in the Sky (2019) at Firstdraft, Sydney, Australia was the first by a Hong Kong artist at the oldest artist-run gallery in the country. Her recent exhibition Polluta, Floating Artist Colony in the Sky (2018) at Pro Arts Gallery in Oakland, California, USA, was the non-profit gallery’s first show by a Hong Kong artist and one of the most successful in its forty-year history. Her award-winning book Tin Hung Gaau Jy 天空膠雨 (Joint Publishing, 2017) tells a cautionary dystopian tale of a future where a frenzy of plastic consumption (i.e., lifesaver donuts, telephone hotdogs) has led humans past the point of no return. Her work Plastic, plastic, every where! received the Grotto Award, Hong Kong Baptist University (2015) and Award of Excellence, Fourth Greater China Illustration Awards (2016). Her exhibition I Don’t Know if You Know How Much I Love You (2012) was the inaugural solo show at Hi Art, a gallery owned by Beijing art tycoon Wu Jing. She has participated in prestigious artist residencies including Banff Centre, Canada; Island Institute, Alaska; and Art Omi, New York (recipient of the Cecily Brown Fellowship).

Roberta Boffo
Roberta Boffo

Roberta Boffo (b. 1986) is an Italian artist, based in Sai Kung, Hong Kong. She has been an art lover and a passionate creator from an early age when designing for her mom’s knitting business, in Oderzo, a small town in the province of Treviso, Italy. Later on she moved to undertake studies in Chinese and Asian languages and cultures at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, which brought her to Beijing, China. Here, she studied business and marketing at Capital Normal University of Beijing and started her career in the education field as a language and art educator and later as education director at an international school. Working with enthusiastic peers and children Roberta was able to further discover her talents and apply her skills to design highly artistic and creative learning environments for children, whilst exploring and developing her techniques and style. With an extensive experience in early childhood education and a strong art background, Roberta now resides in Hong Kong, where she continues to produce her works, whilst collaborating with art institutions and various organizations and the local community to spread the joy of art. As an artist, Roberta takes you into the journey of abstracts and intuitive art. Strongly driven by emotions, Roberta’s art comes alive in monochromatic, lengthy and detailed works that develop from her love for Kandinsky and her passion for Chinese ink and calligraphy. Roberta explains her monochromatic ink work reflects her peaceful, calm and content state of being, highlighting its therapeutic and meditative power. In her process of creation, Roberta feels as if she becomes a vessel bringing a projection of her mind and all its secrets to life. Since an early age, Roberta was drawn to the colour black and now after many years, she realizes that her crave for a balance between black and white is the driving force in her desire to instil balance in her life.